Thursday, August 31, 2017

AWS Certified SysOps Administrator - Associate exam experience and few exam related tips

I sat the AWS Certified SysOps Administrator - Associate exam today and passed, in this post I would share my exam experience and a few exam related tips.


There were 55 questions in this exam and and most of the questions were quite trickier than AWS Solution Architect - Associate exam and I hardly found any definitive question however that doesn't mean you would not read and understand definitions of different services ;) 

There were scenario based questions about changing tenancy of a running instance, placement group, EBS snapshots, Instance/ephemeral storage, ELB, Auto-scaling, Route53 records, Routing policy, IAM policies, S3 storage related backup scenario, network connectivity related questions in VPC, Cloudwatch alarms, health checks, Multi-AZ RDS & Read replica, Elastic beanstalk, Cloud Formation, Opswork and AWS shared responsibility model etc.

Here is my exam score, Overall Score: 83%

Topic Level Scoring:
1.0 Monitoring and Metrics: 87%
2.0 High Availability: 100%
3.0 Analysis: 55%
4.0 Deployment and Provisioning: 87%
5.0 Data Management: 85%
6.0 Security: 75%
7.0 Networking: 100%

About the preparation of this exam, learn ins and out of all the AWS services covered in this exam by heart and the best option to do that is, watch this certification's training CBTs few times and once you are done with that now review the FAQ of these services and read AWS security withe paper once. 

I used Ryan Kroonenburg aka AcloudGuru's ( AWS Certified SysOps Administrator - Associate  online ILVT course and Elias Khnaser's AWS Certified SysOps Administrator - Associate course on Pluralsight however i must say any one of these course is suffice to pass the exam.

I would also suggest going for AWS solution architect course/exam first, as it would give you a better understanding about most of the AWS services and provide a solid base for this SysOps exam.

My Previous post about AWS Certified Solution Architect exam experience and few exam related tips can be found here.

Finally before going for the exam, make sure you also practiced on various sample questions available over web, however don't depend on then them as you would find many wrong answers there (however you will be able to to catch them only if you know the ins and out of different serveries by heart).

Hope this would be helpful in passing you AWS Sysops exam....Best of Luck!

That's it.... :)


Thursday, August 17, 2017

Windows Server reboot/shutdown events in event viewer

Ever found yourself wondering about an unexpected system reboot, these event IDs are very useful while one is investigating the cause of unexpected system shutdown/reboot. 
I not sure about others but but always found hard remembering these event IDs so making a note for future reference and believe others will also find it useful.

Server reboot/shutdown events:
  •  Event ID 6005: “The event log service was started.” This is synonymous to system startup.
  •   Event ID 6006: “The event log service was stopped.” This is synonymous to system shutdown.
  •   Event ID 6008: "The previous system shutdown was unexpected." Records that the system started  after it was not shut down properly.
  •   Event ID 6009: Indicates the Windows product name, version, build number, service pack number,   and operating system type detected at boot time.
  •    Event ID 6013: Displays the uptime of the computer. There is no TechNet page for this id.
  •    Event ID 1074: "The process X has initiated the restart / shutdown of computer on behalf of user     Y for the following reason: Z." Indicates that an application or a user initiated a restart or                  shutdown.
  •    Event ID 1076: "The reason supplied by user X for the last unexpected shutdown of this computer    is: Y." Records when the first user with shutdown privileges logs on to the computer after an           unexpected restart or shutdown and supplies a reason for the occurrence.
Note: In case of unexpected shoutdown due to power failure, there would be no event created.

To know the system boot Time:
  C:\systeminfo | find /i “boot time”


That's it... :)


Thursday, July 13, 2017

Microsoft eBook Giveaway: Millions of Microsoft e-books available for free download

This is the time of year again when Microsoft is giving away millions of e-books for free, this includes books for Windows servers, SQL Server, SCCM, exchange, PowerShell, Azure Cloud and etc.

Please make use of this opportunity and download any required e-book.

Checkout below MSDN blog for the list of available books/download links,



Happy learning… J


Monday, July 10, 2017

PowerCLI script to create multiple PortGroups on a newly added VMhost

This script is useful when you are introducing a a new host to your environment and need to create multiple VLANs on this host.
Both of these script would do the same thing but the only difference is, to make use of first script you first need to create a csv file having VirtualSwitchName, VLANname, VLANid details on the other hand second script would take one host of your choice as reference and would create the same VLANs on target host.
Script 1: -

<# ==================================================================

Title: create_multiple_vlan-2.ps1

Description:this script can be used to create VLANs on a newly added VMhost, it will read VLAN-detail.csv and create VM port groups

Requirements: Windows Powershell with PowerCLI installed

Pre-req: You need to create a vlan-detail.csv with required VirtualSwitchName, VLANname, VLANid, and the the vSwitch should be present on target host

Usage: .\create_multiple_vlan.ps1

==================================================================== #>

Add-PSSnapin VMware.VimAutomation.Core

$myvc = read-host -Prompt "Enter your vCenter server Name or IP name"

Connect-VIServer $myvc

$targetVMhost = read-host -Prompt "Enter your target host name"

$InputFile = “c:\vlan-detail.csv”

$MyVLANFile = Import-CSV $InputFile

ForEach ($VLAN in $MyVLANFile) {

$MyvSwitch = $VLAN.VirtualSwitchName

$MyVLANname = $VLAN.VLANname

$MyVLANid = $VLAN.VLANid

get-vmhost $targetVMhost | Get-VirtualSwitch -Name $MyvSwitch | New-VirtualPortGroup -Name $MyVLANname -VLanId $MyVLANid

}

disconnect-VIServer $myvc -Confirm:$false

Script 2 :-
<# ==================================================================

Title: create_multiple_vlan.ps1

Description:this script can be used to create VLANs on a newly added VMhost by taking referance of any existing host

Requirements: Windows Powershell with PowerCLI installed

pre-req: vSwitch should be present on target gost

Usage: .\create_multiple_vlan.ps1

==================================================================== #>

Add-PSSnapin VMware.VimAutomation.Core

$myvc = read-host -Prompt "Enter your vCenter server Name or IP name"

Connect-VIServer $myvc

$sourceVMhost = read-host -Prompt "Enter your source host name"

$targetVMhost = read-host -Prompt "Enter your target host name"

get-vmhost $sourceVMhost | Get-VirtualSwitch | Get-VirtualPortGroup | select VirtualSwitchName, Name, vlanID | export-csv "c:\vlan-detail.csv" -NoTypeInformation

$InputFile = “c:\vlan-detail.csv”

$MyVLANFile = Import-CSV $InputFile

ForEach ($VLAN in $MyVLANFile) {

$MyvSwitch = $VLAN.VirtualSwitchName

$MyVLANname = $VLAN.name

$MyVLANid = $VLAN.VLANid

get-vmhost $targetVMhost | Get-VirtualSwitch -Name $MyvSwitch | New-VirtualPortGroup -Name $MyVLANname -VLanId $MyVLANid

}

Remove-Item $InputFile

disconnect-VIServer $myvc -Confirm:$false

Hope these scripts would be useful.

That's it... :)


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

AWS Certified Solution Architect exam experience and few exam related tips

Last week I attempted and passed my AWS Certified Solution Architect exam, in this post I would share my exam experience and a few exam related tips.

I have never been as anxious and scared as I was before this exam and the obvious reason was not having much hands on experience on AWS platform and the exam feedback related posts which I read on different AWS forums where people are talking about how though these AWS exams are however once the exam started and after looking at first few questions all nervousness instantly went away. Now After passing this exam I can say the questions were very fair neither lengthy nor very hard and what I mean by this is, if you study all the AWS services which are covered in this exam and understand the in and out of them, then you are going to pass this exam easily.

Here is my exam score, Overall Score: 98%

Topic Level Scoring:
1.0 Designing highly available, cost efficient, fault tolerant, scalable systems : 96%
2.0 Implementation/Deployment: 100%
3.0 Security: 100%
4.0 Troubleshooting: 100%

I was preparing for AWS CSA as well as Sysops certification from last three - four months and during my preparation I watched ACloud.guru and Plurasight.com CBT videos two – three times as well as read about different AWS service guides on AWS docs site few times times.   

Services I focused for this particular exam : 
S3
IAM
EC2
Storage Gateways
VPC
Route53
CloudWatch
CloudTrail
CloudFront
ELB
CloudFormation
AutoScalling
ElasticBeanstalk
RDS
DynamoDB
SQS
SNS
SES
Redshift


This exam had 60 questions and out of which around 30 questions were scenario based, where you would be tested about your knowledge of different AWS services…Which service fits best where.  

Beside above listed services, read and understand following one page docs, you would find scenario based questions related to these topics  
















And most importantly don’t forget to read the FAQ of S3, VPC, EC2, Route53 and RDS/DynmoDB as well as Security related whitepaper.


Hope this would be helpful in passing your AWS CSA exam....Best of Luck!

That's it.... :)